• free shipping of order above 299 €
  • Orders made before 12pm shipping same day
  • Need a better price? Or special DISCOUNT, call us !
  • free shipping of order above 299 €
  • Orders made before 12pm shipping same day
  • Need a better price? Or special DISCOUNT, call us !

Charred wood

Charred wood, burnt wood or carbon - wood: why is it better than ordinary wood and where is it used?

Everyone knows that wood cannot be left to itself - under the influence of external forces, it quickly collapses. Impregnation with antiseptics and flame retardants is needed. But there is another effective defense, without the use of "chemistry

Many years ago, our ancestors noticed that if you burn a piece of wood a little, it will become longer lasting. This technique, called Shou Sugi Ban or Yakisugi (<<cedar languishing>>), is believed to have originated in Japan. Although there is quite reliable data that wood was processed in this way on all continents, including ours. In Europe, burning wood or charred wood was used to protect pile posts, joists, floorboards, wall cladding and roofing.

Today, the ancient method of heat treatment of wood is not only not forgotten, but is becoming more and more popular. The development of technology has made it possible to bring it to perfection. The wood burn with a gas burner/blowtorch or aged in a kiln, resulting of the burn process is a new  and improved wood material.

Under the influence of high temperatures, all possible "embryos" of decay is die. The wood sugar burns out, making the wood tasteless to woodworms and other harmful microorganisms. The molten resin closes the pores of the material, due to which it becomes less hygroscopic, or, in simple terms, ceases to be “afraid” of water.

 

As strange as it may sound, burned wood becomes retardant. It is almost impossible to reignite an already burnt board.

Charred Larch Ireland
But that's not all. In the process of pyrolysis, the wood becomes amazingly beautiful. It darkens, becoming dark chocolate or impenetrable black, and acquires a noble silvery sheen that cannot be realized with any paints.